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Incredible Places Where The Ocean Glows




Bioluminescent Bay
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Location - Las Croabas Beach, Fajardo, Puerto Rico - There are in all three bioluminescent lagoons that look divine during dark nights.
- This unique bay contains up to 720,000 single-celled bioluminescent dinoflagellates per gallon of water. These half-plant, half-animal organisms emit a flash of bluish light when agitated at night.
- Unique light is an ordinary chemical response forced by tiny creatures which typically respond by giving off the light collected in the daytime. As a result, the best possible view of bio-luminescence comes after a sunny day.



Toyama Bay - Japan
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Here the bioluminescence is not because of phytoplankton, but because of a creature called the firefly squid. Every year from March to June, the bay becomes inundated with millions of these three-inch squid, which come up from the depths of the ocean to breed. As they fill the waters and beaches, both fishermen and tourist operations spring into action.

 


San Diego
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- Bizarre bioluminescence in this Southern Californian city, too, is caused when millions of phytoplankton form a group of algae so big they discolour the nearby water.
- Surfers see a "red tide" every few years, when these algal blooms give the sea a reddish tint by day and a bright blue phosphorescent glow by night.
- When the right combination of water temperature, wind, darkness of the sky and other factors come together, surfers and swimmers can glide through the water with a glow illuminating their way.
- The best time to visit California's coast to view the red tide is in the summer when the weather is warm. California's red tide typically occurs between April and August.


Navarre Beach - Florida
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- During warm summer months, when the plankton is right, the water glows as both boaters and fish move through the water.
- According to the VisitFlorida tourism website, the effect makes "fish look like blue comets." "> Location- Santa Rosa Island in the Gulf of Mexico - During warm summer months, when the plankton is right, the water glows as both boaters and fish move through the water.
- According to the VisitFlorida tourism website, the effect makes "fish look like blue comets."



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